white bread a social history of the store bought loaf

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White Bread

Author : Aaron Bobrow-Strain
ISBN : 9780807044681
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 43. 63 MB
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What can the history of America's one-hundred-year love-hate relationship with sliced white bread tell us about contemporary efforts to change the way we eat? Fluffy industrial loaves are about as far from slow, local, and organic as you can get, but the story of social reformers, food experts, and diet gurus who believed that getting people to eat certain food could restore the nation's decaying physical, moral, and social fabric will sound very familiar. White Bread teaches us that when Americans debate what one should eat, they are also wrestling with larger questions of race, class, immigration, and gender. As Bobrow-Strain traces the story of bread, from the first factory loaf to the latest gourmet pain au levain, he shows how efforts to champion "good food" reflect dreams of a better society--even as they reinforce stark social hierarchies. In the early twentieth century, the factory-baked loaf heralded a new future, a world away from the hot, dusty, "dirty" bakeries run by immigrants. This bread, the original "superfood," was fortified with vitamins and marketed as patriotic. However, sixties counterculture made white bread an icon of all that was wrong with America. Today, the alternative food movement favors foods deemed ethical and environmentally correct to eat. In a time when open disdain for "unhealthy" eaters and discrimination on the basis of eating habits grow increasingly acceptable, White Bread is a timely and important examination of what we talk about when we talk about food.

White Bread

Author : Aaron Bobrow-Strain
ISBN : 0807044784
Genre : Cooking
File Size : 29. 51 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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What can the history of America's one-hundred-year love-hate relationship with sliced white bread tell us about contemporary efforts to change the way we eat? How did white bread, once an icon of American progress, become "white trash"? Fluffy industrial loaves are about as far from slow, local, and organic as you can get, but the story of social reformers, food experts, and diet gurus who believed that getting people to eat certain food could restore the nation's decaying physical, moral, and social fabric will sound very familiar. This book teaches us that when Americans debate what one should eat, they are also wrestling with larger questions of race, class, immigration, and gender. Here the author argues that what we think about the humble, puffy loaf says a lot about who we are and what we want our society to look like. As he traces the story of bread, from the first factory loaf to the latest gourmet pain au levain, he shows how efforts to champion "good food" reflect dreams of a better society, even as they reinforced stark social hierarchies. As open disdain for "unhealthy" eaters and discrimination on the basis of eating habits grow increasingly acceptable, the subject of this book is a timely examination of what we talk about when we talk about food.

Six Thousand Years Of Bread

Author : H. E. Jacob
ISBN : 1602391246
Genre : Cooking
File Size : 32. 34 MB
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“In a colossal epic tale, Mr. Jacob has sketched world history—its folkways, its religion, its superstition, and its plagues, all in terms of bread.” —Wall Street Journal From ancient Egypt to modern times, bread has been the essential food, the very symbol of fundamental well-being. First published in 1944 and the result of more two decades’ research, Six Thousand Years of Bread is a thought-provoking journey through bread’s role in politics, religion, technology, war, civilization, and beyond. A cult favorite among bakers and foodies, this beautiful new seventieth anniversary edition will fascinate philosophers, historians, and bakers alike. The fascinating voyage begins with bread in prehistoric times and continues with an exploration of the plow, the discovery of baking, the Greek passion for seed corn and reverence for the bread goddess Demeter, the significance of the Bible’s many references to bread, and how bread contributed to the outcome of World War I. In a poignant conclusion, Jacob describes his own experiences subsisting on bread made of sawdust in a Nazi concentration camp. Six Thousand Years of Bread is a brilliant celebration of bread and the remarkable role it has played throughout human history.

Eating Fossil Fuels

Author : Dale Allen Pfeiffer
ISBN : 9781550923766
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 79. 97 MB
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A shocking outline of the interlinked crises in energy and agriculture--and appropriate responses.

Bread

Author : William Rubel
ISBN : 9781861899613
Genre : Cooking
File Size : 31. 21 MB
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It is difficult to think of a food more basic, more essential, and more universal than bread. Common to the diets of both the rich and the poor, bread is one of our oldest foods. Loaves and rolls have been found in ancient Egyptian tombs, and wheat has been found in pits where human settlements flourished 8,000 years ago. Many anthropologists argue that the ability to sow and reap cereals, the grains necessary for making bread, could be one of the main reasons why man settled in communities, and even today the concept of “breaking bread together” is a lasting symbol of the uniting power of a meal. Bread is an innovative mix of traditional history, cultural history, travelogue, and cookbook. William Rubel begins with the amazing invention of bread approximately 20,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent and ends by speculating on the ways in which cultural forces and advances in biotechnology may influence the development of bread in the twenty-first century. Rubel shows how simple choices, may be responsible for the widespread preference for wheat over other bread grains and for the millennia-old association of elite dining with white bread. He even provides an analysis of the different components of bread, such as crust and crumb, so that readers may better understand the breads they buy. With many recipes integrated with the text and a glossary covering one hundred breads, Bread goes well beyond the simple choice of white or wheat. Here, general readers will find an approachable introduction to the history of bread and to the many forms that bread takes throughout the world, and bread bakers will discover a history of the craft and new ways of thinking that will inspire experimentation.

Creamy Crunchy

Author : Jon Krampner
ISBN : 9780231162326
Genre : Cooking
File Size : 50. 2 MB
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Draws on interviews, research, and travels in the peanut-growing regions of the South to discuss the history of peanut butter, its manufacture from the 1890s to the present, and its cultural, nutritional, and molecular evolution.

Refrigeration Nation

Author : Jonathan Rees
ISBN : 9781421411071
Genre : History
File Size : 39. 14 MB
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Only when the power goes off and food spoils do we truly appreciate how much we rely on refrigerators and freezers. In Refrigeration Nation, Jonathan Rees explores the innovative methods and gadgets that Americans have invented to keep perishable food cold—from cutting river and lake ice and shipping it to consumers for use in their iceboxes to the development of electrically powered equipment that ushered in a new age of convenience and health. As much a history of successful business practices as a history of technology, this book illustrates how refrigeration has changed the everyday lives of Americans and why it remains so important today. Beginning with the natural ice industry in 1806, Rees considers a variety of factors that drove the industry, including the point and product of consumption, issues of transportation, and technological advances. Rees also shows that how we obtain and preserve perishable food is related to our changing relationship with the natural world. He compares how people have used the "cold chain" in America to its use in other countries, offering insight into more than just what we eat. Refrigeration Nation helps explain one small part of who we are as a people. -- Mansel G. Blackford, author of Making Seafood Sustainable: American Experiences in Global PerspectiveLinda Pelaccio

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