someplace like america tales from the new great depression

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Someplace Like America

Author : Dale Maharidge
ISBN : 9780520956506
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38. 2 MB
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In Someplace Like America, writer Dale Maharidge and photographer Michael S. Williamson take us to the working-class heart of America, bringing to life—through shoe leather reporting, memoir, vivid stories, stunning photographs, and thoughtful analysis—the deepening crises of poverty and homelessness. The story begins in 1980, when the authors joined forces to cover the America being ignored by the mainstream media—people living on the margins and losing their jobs as a result of deindustrialization. Since then, Maharidge and Williamson have traveled more than half a million miles to investigate the state of the working class (winning a Pulitzer Prize in the process). In Someplace Like America, they follow the lives of several families over the thirty-year span to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless. This brilliant and essential study—begun in the trickle-down Reagan years and culminating with the recent banking catastrophe—puts a human face on today’s grim economic numbers. It also illuminates the courage and resolve with which the next generation faces the future.

Someplace Like America

Author : Dale Maharidge
ISBN : 9780520262478
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 47. 12 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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Travel to the working-class heart of America, and follow the deepening crises of poverty and homelessness. Starting in 1980, Maharidge and Williamson have investigated the state of the working class. They follow the lives of several families over a thirty-year span to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless.

Someplace Like America

Author : Dale Maharidge
ISBN : 9780520948792
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 32. 4 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 417
Read : 491

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In Someplace Like America, writer Dale Maharidge and photographer Michael S. Williamson take us to the working-class heart of America, bringing to life—through shoe leather reporting, memoir, vivid stories, stunning photographs, and thoughtful analysis—the deepening crises of poverty and homelessness. The story begins in 1980, when the authors joined forces to cover the America being ignored by the mainstream media—people living on the margins and losing their jobs as a result of deindustrialization. Since then, Maharidge and Williamson have traveled more than half a million miles to investigate the state of the working class (winning a Pulitzer Prize in the process). In Someplace Like America, they follow the lives of several families over the thirty-year span to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless. This brilliant and essential study—begun in the trickle-down Reagan years and culminating with the recent banking catastrophe—puts a human face on today’s grim economic numbers. It also illuminates the courage and resolve with which the next generation faces the future.

Journey To Nowhere

Author : Dale Maharidge
ISBN : CORNELL:31924071672483
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 70. 92 MB
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Looks at America's homeless and poor and tells the stories of farm workers, illegal aliens, and the unemployed

And Their Children After Them

Author : Dale Maharidge
ISBN : 1583226575
Genre : Antiques & Collectibles
File Size : 33. 29 MB
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The writer/photographer team Dale Maharidge and Michael Williamson return to the land and families captured in Agee and Evans's inimitable Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, extending the project of conscience and chronicling the traumatic decline of King Cotton. With this continuation of their project, Maharidge and Williamson not only uncover some surprising historical secrets relating to the families and to Agee himself, but also effectively lay to rest Agee's fear that his work, from lack of reverence or resilience, would be but another offence to the humanity of its subjects.

Invisible Nation

Author : Richard Schweid
ISBN : 0520292677
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 62. 56 MB
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"Every year, more than 2.5 million children are left homeless in the United States and the number of such families continues to rise annually. In every state, children are living in small quarters packed in with relatives-- in cars, in motel rooms, or in emergency shelters. In this vividly-written narrative, experienced journalist Richard Schweid takes us on a spirited journey through this "invisible nation,' giving us front-row dispatches of suffering families on the edge. Based on in-depth reporting from five major cities, Invisible Nation looks backward at the historical context of family homelessness as well as forward at what needs to be done to alleviate this widespread, although often hidden, poverty. Invisible Nation is a riveting must-read for everyone who cares about inequality, poverty and family life"--Provided by publishe

Bound For Freedom

Author : Douglas Flamming
ISBN : 0520940288
Genre : History
File Size : 39. 13 MB
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Paul Bontemps decided to move his family to Los Angeles from Louisiana in 1906 on the day he finally submitted to a strictly enforced Southern custom—he stepped off the sidewalk to allow white men who had just insulted him to pass by. Friends of the Bontemps family, like many others beckoning their loved ones West, had written that Los Angeles was "a city called heaven" for people of color. But just how free was Southern California for African Americans? This splendid history, at once sweeping in its historical reach and intimate in its evocation of everyday life, is the first full account of Los Angeles's black community in the half century before World War II. Filled with moving human drama, it brings alive a time and place largely ignored by historians until now, detailing African American community life and political activism during the city's transformation from small town to sprawling metropolis. Writing with a novelist's sensitivity to language and drawing from fresh historical research, Douglas Flamming takes us from Reconstruction to the Jim Crow era, through the Great Migration, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, and the build-up to World War II. Along the way, he offers rich descriptions of the community and its middle-class leadership, the women who were front and center with men in the battle against racism in the American West. In addition to drawing a vivid portrait of a little-known era, Flamming shows that the history of race in Los Angeles is crucial for our understanding of race in America. The civil rights activism in Los Angeles laid the foundation for critical developments in the second half of the century that continue to influence us to this day.

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