representing the race the creation of the civil rights lawyer

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Representing The Race

Author : Kenneth W. Mack
ISBN : 9780674065307
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 66. 9 MB
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Profiles African American lawyers during the era of segregation and the civil rights movement, with an emphasis on the conflicts they felt between their identities as African Americans and their professional identities as lawyers.

Representing The Race

Author : Kenneth W. Mack
ISBN : 0674046870
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38. 56 MB
Format : PDF
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Representing the Race tells the story of African American lawyers who, during the era of segregation, confronted a tension between their racial and professional identities. Their untold stories pose the unsettling question: What, ultimately, does it mean to “represent” a minority group in the give-and-take of American law and politics?

Voices Of Civil Rights Lawyers

Author : Kent Spriggs
ISBN : 081305432X
Genre : History
File Size : 32. 96 MB
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"One of the great, largely unknown stories of American history. This volume is a wonderfully evocative demonstration of something often discounted--how important law and lawyers were, and remain, in realizing the promise of full equality for all citizens."--Kenneth W. Mack, author of Representing the Race: The Creation of the Civil Rights Lawyer "Filled with tales of ordinary people exhibiting extraordinary courage, Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers provides a penetrating and vital new perspective on one of the most turbulent and important periods in American history."--Lawrence Goldstone, author of Inherently Unequal: The Betrayal of Equal Rights by the Supreme Court, 1865-1903 "Spriggs has performed a great service for future historians and for all of us by collecting the personal memories of lawyers who put their boots on the ground and their lives on the line in the Deep South during the tumultuous Civil Rights Movement."--James Blacksher, civil rights attorney, Birmingham, Alabama "The different voices are incredibly effective at both describing a harrowing series of events for the lawyers and allowing readers to hear how they interpreted those events in their own individual ways. A powerful work."--Thomas Aiello, author of Jim Crow's Last Stand: Nonunanimous Criminal Jury Verdicts in Louisiana While bus boycotts, sit-ins, and other acts of civil disobedience were the engine of the civil rights movement, the law was a primary context. Lawyers played a key role during the profound social upheavals, and the twenty-six contributors to this volume reveal what it was like to be a southern civil rights lawyer in this era. These eyewitness accounts provide unique windows onto the most dramatic moments in civil rights history, illuminating the legal fights that heralded the 1965 Selma March, the first civil judgment against the Ku Klux Klan, the creation of ballot access for blacks in Alabama, and the 1968 Democratic Convention. White and black, male and female, Northern- and Southern-born, these lawyers discuss both the abuses they endured and the barriers they broke as they helped shape a critical chapter of American history.

Harvard Law Review

Author : Harvard Law Review
ISBN : 9781610278812
Genre : Law
File Size : 79. 35 MB
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The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents and URLs, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 8 include: Article, "Racial Capitalism," by Nancy Leong Essay, "Shallow Signals," by Bert I. Huang Book Review, "All Unhappy Families: Tales of Old Age, Rational Actors, and the Disordered Life," by Ariela R. Dubler Book Review, "Lawyers, Law, and the New Civil Rights History," by Risa Goluboff Note, "Recasting the U.S. International Trade Commission’s Role in the Patent System" Note, "Juvenile Miranda Waiver and Parental Rights" Note, "The Province of the Jurist: Judicial Resistance to Expert Testimony on Eyewitnesses as Institutional Rivalry" Note, "Proposing a Locally Driven Entrepreneur Visa" In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as Illinois’s ban on public carry of firearms, "bookmarking" of infringing material as a copyright violation, causation and criminals' statutory restitution, free movement rights in the EU, local bottling and the dormant commerce clause, and binding unnamed class members with a denial of class action certification. Finally, the issue includes notes on Recent Publications as well as a comprehensive Index to Volume 126 (2012-2013).

Loren Miller

Author : Amina Hassan
ISBN : 9780806152677
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 70. 29 MB
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Loren Miller was one of the nation’s most prominent civil rights attorneys from the 1940s through the early 1960s, particularly in the fields of housing and education. With co-counsel Thurgood Marshall, he argued two landmark civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, whose decisions effectively abolished racially restrictive housing covenants. One of these cases, Shelley v. Kraemer (1948), is taught in nearly every American law school today. Loren Miller: Civil Rights Attorney and Journalist recovers this remarkable figure from the margins of history and for the first time fully reveals his life for what it was: an extraordinary American story and a critical chapter in the annals of racial justice. Born the son of a former slave and a white midwesterner in 1903, Loren Miller lived the quintessential American success story, both by rising from rural poverty to a position of power and influence and by blazing his own path. Author Amina Hassan reveals Miller as a fearless critic of the powerful and an ardent debater whose acid wit was known to burn “holes in the toughest skin and eat right through double-talk, hypocrisy, and posturing.” As a freshly minted member of the bar who preferred political activism and writing to the law, Miller set out for Los Angeles from Kansas in 1929. Hassan describes his early career as a fiery radical journalist, as well as his ownership of the California Eagle, one of the longest-running African American newspapers in the West. In his work with the California branch of the ACLU, Miller sought to halt the internment of West Coast Japanese citizens, helped integrate the U.S. military and the Los Angeles Fire Department, and defended Black Muslims arrested in a deadly street battle with the LAPD. Hassan charts Miller’s ceaseless commitment to improving the lives of Americans regardless of their race or ethnicity. In 1964, Governor Edmund G. Brown appointed Miller as a Municipal Court justice for Los Angeles County. The story told here in full for the first time is of a true American original who defied societal limitations to reshape the racial and political landscape of twentieth-century America.

Unjust Deeds

Author : Jeffrey D. Gonda
ISBN : 9781469625461
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 82. 84 MB
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In 1945, six African American families from St. Louis, Detroit, and Washington, D.C., began a desperate fight to keep their homes. Each of them had purchased a property that prohibited the occupancy of African Americans and other minority groups through the use of legal instruments called racial restrictive covenants--one of the most pervasive tools of residential segregation in the aftermath of World War II. Over the next three years, local activists and lawyers at the NAACP fought through the nation's courts to end the enforcement of these discriminatory contracts. Unjust Deeds explores the origins and complex legacies of their dramatic campaign, culminating in a landmark Supreme Court victory in Shelley v. Kraemer (1948). Restoring this story to its proper place in the history of the black freedom struggle, Jeffrey D. Gonda's groundbreaking study provides a critical vantage point to the simultaneously personal, local, and national dimensions of legal activism in the twentieth century and offers a new understanding of the evolving legal fight against Jim Crow in neighborhoods and courtrooms across America.

Yale Law Journal Volume 125 Number 8 June 2016

Author : Yale Law Journal
ISBN : 9781610277815
Genre : Law
File Size : 61. 34 MB
Format : PDF
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